Pinholes in NIR and UVA

Using the E-M1 converted to full spectrum with the Pinhole Pro objectives is possible. Using a 58 mm NIR filter (Hoya R72) attached to the front of the 11 mm Pinhole Pro S11 worked fine, with no increase in vignetting. Using the StraightEdgeU 52 mm or Baader U-filter 2″  with a step-down ring blocked the corners of the image completely. The original 26 mm Pinhole Pro suffers a lot less from vignetting and can be used with these filters of smaller diameter than the front thread of the lens without problem.

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High dynamic range

High dynamic range (HDR) is used to refer to photographs which have captured a broader range of luminosity values than what is usual. In most contexts it implies a higher dynamic range than a digital camera sensor can detect between saturation and its noise floor. How can this be achieved? By combining several images so that different parts of the scene come for images taken with different exposure settings. In other words exposure bracketing followed by digital processing to merge the images. If you do not know what is the meaning of bracketing in photography please first read my earlier post on the subject. Continue reading High dynamic range

Dimming of LEDs

If you are interested in photography, and take photographs under illumination from LEDs, you need to be aware of how the dimming of LED lamps works. LEDs are becoming very popular, and dimmers are quite frequently used to adjust the light level. This applies to households, offices, commercial spaces, and the now ubiquitous special LED lamps sold for studio and on location video and photography. Continue reading Dimming of LEDs

Fluorescence of glass filters

Until very recently I was not aware that optical glass filters can fluoresce when exposed to ultraviolet radiation. In this short post I use two filters from Heliopan that I own as examples of this. However, many other filters, and even the glass elements in some camera lenses can also fluoresce. Continue reading Fluorescence of glass filters

AC line frequency and shutter speed

The light output of many types of lamps varies at twice the frequency of mains AC line frequency. Alternating power follows a sinusoidal shape, alternating between positive and negative half cycles. This causes the doubling of the frequency, for each half cycle in the power supply there is pulse in the light output. Continue reading AC line frequency and shutter speed