Hemispherical time-lapse under a tree

In two earlier posts titled “Lens adapter with filter drawer” and “Lens adapters: flange-to-flange distance” I discussed how crucial it is to achieve the exact effective flange-to-flange distance when dealing with adapted objectives with a very short focal distance. I also described how I shimmed an adapter to achieve this.

Recently I had an opportunity to use the Sigma 4.5mm 1:2.8 circular fisheye objective in Nikon AF mount adapted to my Olympus E-M1 Mk II camera to create a time-lapse video. I captured 500 images, with a pause of 1 s between them. Total time was a bit over 10 min as capturing each of the images did take a fraction of a second. The lens and camera performed very well.

The first image in the sequence of 500, RAW image converted to a reduced size jpeg file in Capture One 20. Click on the image to view the video at Vimeo.

Measuring campaign in the Alps

I joined a field measuring campaign organized by my collaborator T. Matthew Robson with the participation of José Ignacio García Plazaola and Beatriz Fernández-Marín from the University of the Basque-Country (see Matt’s CanSEE and my SenPEP blogs for information on our research). We spent the last week of May the at 2100 m a.s.l. in the Alps at the Jardin Botanique du Lautaret measuring solar radiation and the responses of plants to it. I did some measurements of solar radiation but spent most of the time photographing plants and lichens to record their optical properties in the ultraviolet-A, visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum.

This posts contains several galleries of photographs from the site and the vegetation.

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