Godox AD200 flash for UV, VIS and IR photography

[Updated 2019-07-18] Godox sells a medium-power flash called AD200 with interchangeable heads and several accessories like light modifiers and remote wireless triggers with TTL exposure metering and high speed synchronization capabilities. This gives a lot of flexibility in its use. After a few separate purchases I now own the AD200 and the H200, H200J and H200R heads, an Xpro-O TTL Wireless Flash Trigger, and several light modifiers, all of them branded Godox. (The same flash and accessories are also available under other brand names.) Continue reading Godox AD200 flash for UV, VIS and IR photography

Digital UVA-photography with M43 equipment

How far can we go, with off-the-shelf equipment

One question which I have been pondering for some time is: do I need to have a digital camera converted to full-spectrum for UVA photography? and are there any modern objectives that are good accidental UVA-objectives?

This is not a question of cost alone. Although a converted camera can be used for VIS photography, obtaining good colour reproduction requires effort. A suitable filter is used on the objective to replace the one removed from the image sensor unit during conversion. As it is not possible to find a perfect match to the filter removed, one or more colour profiles of the camera need to be created and applied instead of the one used automatically by the camera and/or raw file converters. So, in many cases, for best results one would need to carry two different cameras to any field trip. In addition a conversion voids the camera manufacturer’s warranty and even access to official service facilities. Continue reading Digital UVA-photography with M43 equipment

Oversized lens hoods and windows

I read during the 1970’s, most likely in a photography magazine, about the use of collapsible rubber lens hoods to take photographs through windows. They do work, specially if one manages to find a stiff enough one that will not collapse instantly at the first bump in the road or in the flight. Hama branded rubber lens hoods did work well for this purpose 45 years ago and those currently available from Hama also do work well. The problem is that given their size one has little room for deviations from pointing straight into the window as vignetting quickly becomes a problem. Neither can one use them with wide angle lenses. Continue reading Oversized lens hoods and windows